This past October, Neighbourhood Watch London introduced Facebook Groups for each of the Forest City's 14 wards. With winter fast approaching and no sign of the pandemic abating any time soon, NWL wants to ensure its members stay connected.

Facebook Groups are great ways to communicate with people who share similar interests. And it's not uncommon for regular FB users to be associated with multiple groups at a time. With ward groups, NWL is hoping to encourage discussions that directly relate to particular areas or neighbourhoods in the city. Whether it be local events, friendly recognitions or safety concerns, NWL's new ward groups will help keep you up to speed in your community.

How to Join

To join your ward's group, visit Neighbourhood Watch London's Facebook page. Next, from the top menu, click the "More" tab and select "Groups."

Person using index finger to navigate social media icons on a tablet.

Find and select the group (ward) you wish to join, answer the three quick membership questions and agree to the group's code of conduct. You should be automatically allowed into the group and begin interacting with other community members.

Note: you may join any of the ward groups providing you fill out the membership questions. You don't have to be from a particular ward to join its group.

Respect the Law

While community pages such as these can provide members with information surrounding personal safety or potential illegal activity, remember to exercise good judgement. Neighbourhood Watch London does not condone vigilantism under any circumstance. If you suspect dangerous or illegal activity in your community, please report to the London Police Service. For emergencies, call: 9-1-1. For non-emergencies, call: 519-661-5670.

...and Each Other

Let's all remember to be as respectful as possible when engaging in online discussions. Part of the beauty of communities is diversity. Despite differing backgrounds and/or opinions, communities are true mosaics of people who come together for one another. So, even though we may not always agree, truly taking the time to listen to someone instead of waiting for our turn to speak can help us understand and empathize.